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  1. Professional Toxicity: A Case Study CO1-275-I

    This case study explores the personal and professional effects of working for a toxic boss and how to approach such a situation. The case is told in first-person, which helps readers fully understand the frustrations that come along with having to work under a superior whose attitude, inability to accept his failures and lack of communication and feedback not only negatively affects the work experience, but also put business negotiations in jeopardy.

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour
  2. The British connection:A ransom negotiation NG1-141-I

    What is the best approach to negotiating the release of a person who has been kidnapped for ransom?

    This case details the step-by-step process used by LondonX, a large British insurance company, to help families of individuals who have been taken hostage negotiate their safe release with their captors. It examines negotiation techniques used by both sides and can be used to analyze various issues including negotiation techniques, alignment of interests between the insurer and the family, advice to victims and families, and ethical issues in high-stakes negotiations.

    Academic Area:
    Others | Negotiation
  3. Country Investment Decision EC2-103-I-M

    Country Investment Decision is an interactive exercise in which students adopt the role of an International Fund Advisor. Students must study the data available about different countries in order to prioritize the investment options and make a final investment proposal.

    The exercise is designed so that different data sets of real countries are firstly considered individually before all the data together is taken into account to make a final proposal. The topics covered are economic indicator data, institutional data, and finally social and political risk data. At each decision stage, the student must justify their choices. A professor’s page displays graphically the evolution of decisions.

    * This material will have personalized links for each student and the professor will have the ability to see individual and aggregate responses before and during the class session.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment
  4. Ontier: A global law firm with a local spirit DE1-211-I

    This case describes the internationalization strategy of the law firm Ontier. Its international value proposition lies in offering its clients the best local legal knowledge as well as a uniform, quality service in all the countries where it has a presence. This value proposition is different than that offered by Spanish law firms, which typically use a network of alliances with local firms to offer their clients the best local legal knowledge. However, the quality of their services is not always uniform in all countries. This case study describes how using a joint venture entry mode helped the company achieve its value proposition and how implementing this strategy required changes in management systems and the company’s structure.

    This case study was designed to promote discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of the different entry modes within an “international strategy” or “corporate strategy” module where other related cases are also discussed. However, it can also be used alone in strategy programs where just one session is dedicated to international strategy since it promotes discussion about important strategy issues such as (a) creating a competitive global advantage, (b) choosing a country to enter, (c) choosing an entry mode or (d) implementing international strategy.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Others
  5. Market Research MK2-103-I-M

    Market Research is an interactive tutorial that shows the process of market research in a very practical manner. Students take on the role of product manager working for a company in the soft drinks sector and are responsible for a new product launch.

    Throughout this tutorial different theoretical content and video examples of market research techniques (such as focus groups and questionnaires) help students to assimilate the main concepts.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing
  6. Consumers' purchasing behavior MK2-107-I

    This document summarizes the concepts and basic processes involved in consumer behavior, emphasizing how understanding consumers' needs benefits both consumers and marketers. Understanding consumer behavior can allow companies to develop a commercial strategy that is better matched to consumers, which will increase demand and optimize the means to generate that demand. Some of the main challenges are the variability of behavior, its changing nature, and the complexities of studying it. The note delves into how consumer behavior can be studied in a systematic and precise way by using a wide range of theoretical approaches and models and how it can be affected by factors such as environmental influences (economic, political, technological and cultural context) and marketing actions. The document outlines the various psychological factors involved in decision-making (personality, lifestyles, beliefs and attitudes, motivation, perception and learning) as well as the non-psychological ones (age, sex, location, etc.) which allow the marketer to better understand the consumers’ buying habits. It explains the basic decision-making model in depth and how consumers’ behaviors can play an active role in generating value for the company or the opposite thanks to undesired behaviors such as boycotts, complaints and negative word of mouth. It wraps up by describing how to move consumers from habit buying to decision making.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing
  7. Positioning: a key factor in marketing strategy MK2-105-I

    The technical note explains the importance of the positioning strategy of the brands within the general marketing strategy of a product or a company. It also describes and analyzes the positioning as a phase in the Marketing process, the advantages of a good positioning and the common mistakes marketers run into when positioning a brand. It emphasizes segmentation as a tool for the positioning strategy.

    This material is details the process of development of the positioning and its phases. It explains stages of market definition, market segmentation, reasons for segmenting or not segmenting, segmentation criteria and differentiation.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing
  8. Product strategy: portfolio management concepts, typ … MK2-106-I

    This note introduces readers to concepts about products. It explains various definitions of what a product is, emphasizing that products are not what the producer wants them to be but how the consumer perceives them. It looks at the value hierarchy for the customer and the levels of the product (core benefit, generic product, expected product, augmented product and potential product) and then goes on to explain its physical and psychological attributes. Next, it delves into the brand emphasizing that it is one of the key elements of the commercial strategy used for products and a valuable strategic asset and then takes a look at the brand identity. Using Nike as a practical example, it introduces readers to the hierarchy of benefits and how to use the brand’s attributes to identify the final identity of the brand. It describes the differences between consumer goods, industrial goods and services and also talks about how to manage a portfolio of products using Procter & Gamble and Pantene as an example. Then it describes the stages of the product market life cycle and how it is essential for any company that wishes to remain profitable over the long term to develop new products. Looking at the Ansoff Matrix, readers are introduced to four different strategies regarding products and markets. Lastly, the note explains the BCG growth/relative market share matrix to show how to determine the strategic situation of a company’s products/markets and the AC matrix to determine the attractiveness and competitiveness of a market.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing
  9. Pedro Gandara CO1-278-I

    Pedro, a young industrial engineer, had just earned his MBA and landed a job at Innovaciones Metalúrgicas S.A., a top engineering consulting firm. His manager Marta, a very intelligent woman and an excellent manager, gave him the tasks of working alone on a difficult set of technical problems they were finding in nickel and tungsten alloys and to attend and contribute to the weekly coordination meetings to the best of his ability. Pedro ended up proposing four potential improvements to Marta in a span of nine months. Marta carefully analyzed each of his proposals. She rejected the first one on the basis of a number of excellent technical arguments. She also rejected the second one because it would be too rigid and time-consuming. Marta thought his third proposal could work but that it had some weaknesses that needed to be dealt with. For his fourth proposal, he decided to focus on something that was technical in nature since that was his expertise. But it wouldn’t work either. Since he had worked so hard on the proposals, he felt very discouraged and disappointed. One the one hand, he acknowledged that Marta was an excellent professional and knew that her decisions were fair. On the other hand, he was very upset because Marta never praised his efforts and focused on the weaknesses in his proposals without any positive feedback. Her managerial style was causing him to lose his enthusiasm and motivation and he was also upset with his colleagues for criticizing him. At the end of the case, Pedro must decide how to handle the situation.

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour | Innovation
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