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  1. La Bugaderia (ACIDH Group) DO1-017-I

    La Bugaderia, an industrial laundry service for institutions and companies that employees people with intellectual impairments, was discussing whether or not to expand its capacity by purchasing a second washing machine. It was facing a challenge because sometimes it could not handle all the work it had and other times there was excess capacity. This led to the idea of expanding capacity in the washing machine area. However, the company had to keep in mind that it was not just the washing phase slowing down the process. The team knew they had to standardize processes and be as competitive as any other competitor in the market, bearing in mind quality, the price and service. The manager thought it would be best to contact an external consultant to analyze the situation in a way that the solution would add value to the specific case as well as address any other production capacity and process problem. After walking the readers through the company’s current process, the consultant explains that orders must be transformed into units that can be used to help make decisions by drawing up a table showing the time use per unit for each step and each kind of resource. The case wraps up with the consultant stating that he will draw up a series of proposals along with a list of questions so that La Bugaderia can decide what step to take.

    Academic Area:
    Operations & Supply Chain Management
  2. La Bugaderia (Grupo ACIDH) DO1-017

    La Bugaderia, an industrial laundry service for institutions and companies that employees people with intellectual impairments, was discussing whether or not to expand its capacity by purchasing a second washing machine. It was facing a challenge because sometimes it could not handle all the work it had and other times there was excess capacity. This led to the idea of expanding capacity in the washing machine area. However, the company had to keep in mind that it was not just the washing phase slowing down the process. The team knew they had to standardize processes and be as competitive as any other competitor in the market, bearing in mind quality, the price and service. The manager thought it would be best to contact an external consultant to analyze the situation in a way that the solution would add value to the specific case as well as address any other production capacity and process problem. After walking the readers through the company’s current process, the consultant explains that orders must be transformed into units that can be used to help make decisions by drawing up a table showing the time use per unit for each step and each kind of resource. The case wraps up with the consultant stating that he will draw up a series of proposals along with a list of questions so that La Bugaderia can decide what step to take.

    Academic Area:
    Operations & Supply Chain Management
  3. THE HUMAN RESOURCES STRATEGIC PLANNING AND A NEW MA … RH2-135-I

    This document sets out to describe the new human resources model for professionals working at leading talent-management organizations. With this in mind, we will talk about a new perspective on people management which underlies this model, and about the Human Resources Strategic Planning that arises from it.

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour | Human Resources
  4. La planificación estratégica de recursos humanos y u … RH2-135

    This document sets out to describe the new human resources model for professionals working at leading talent-management organizations. With this in mind, we will talk about a new perspective on people management which underlies this model, and about the Human Resources Strategic Planning that arises from it.

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour | Human Resources
  5. Japón 2010: Los años perdidos EC1-122

    This case takes a look at the events that led up to the bursting of Japan’s stock-market bubble in 2010. It begins by describing the economic situation in Japan in the 1980s at the start of the crisis, delving into the appreciation of the yen, loss of competitiveness, low interest rates, the over-valuation of the stock market leading to inflation and the upward trend in the unemployment rate. It emphasizes that there were twenty years of poor political leadership where the political party changed frequently. The case outlines the government in Japan during the nineties and includes a detailed description of how each prime minister’s actions affected the economy. Then in 2001, seeking economic recovery, Koizumi’s government launched a comprehensive plan of reforms based on solving the problem of bad debts, establishing a stable financial system and defining seven programs of structural reform. When Koizumi left office, the economic situation was unstable and between 2006 and 2009, up to three different prime ministers occupied the post. Between 2007 and 2009, stimulus packages implemented by the government caused public debt as a percentage of Japan’s GDP to increase nearly 55 percent. This led the Bank of Japan to take emergency measures. In 2009, Hatoyama came into power, ending the Koizumi era. The government then had their chance to put an end to the “lost years.”

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  6. Japan 2010: The lost years EC1-122-I

    This case takes a look at the events that led up to the bursting of Japan’s stock-market bubble in 2010. It begins by describing the economic situation in Japan in the 1980s at the start of the crisis, delving into the appreciation of the yen, loss of competitiveness, low interest rates, the over-valuation of the stock market leading to inflation and the upward trend in the unemployment rate. It emphasizes that there were twenty years of poor political leadership where the political party changed frequently. The case outlines the government in Japan during the nineties and includes a detailed description of how each prime minister’s actions affected the economy. Then in 2001, seeking economic recovery, Koizumi’s government launched a comprehensive plan of reforms based on solving the problem of bad debts, establishing a stable financial system and defining seven programs of structural reform. When Koizumi left office, the economic situation was unstable and between 2006 and 2009, up to three different prime ministers occupied the post. Between 2007 and 2009, stimulus packages implemented by the government caused public debt as a percentage of Japan’s GDP to increase nearly 55 percent. This led the Bank of Japan to take emergency measures. In 2009, Hatoyama came into power, ending the Koizumi era. The government then had their chance to put an end to the “lost years.”

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  7. [Japanese Version] Japan 2010: The lost years EC1-122-J

    This case takes a look at the events that led up to the bursting of Japan’s stock-market bubble in 2010. It begins by describing the economic situation in Japan in the 1980s at the start of the crisis, delving into the appreciation of the yen, loss of competitiveness, low interest rates, the over-valuation of the stock market leading to inflation and the upward trend in the unemployment rate. It emphasizes that there were twenty years of poor political leadership where the political party changed frequently. The case outlines the government in Japan during the nineties and includes a detailed description of how each prime minister’s actions affected the economy. Then in 2001, seeking economic recovery, Koizumi’s government launched a comprehensive plan of reforms based on solving the problem of bad debts, establishing a stable financial system and defining seven programs of structural reform. When Koizumi left office, the economic situation was unstable and between 2006 and 2009, up to three different prime ministers occupied the post. Between 2007 and 2009, stimulus packages implemented by the government caused public debt as a percentage of Japan’s GDP to increase nearly 55 percent. This led the Bank of Japan to take emergency measures. In 2009, Hatoyama came into power, ending the Koizumi era. The government then had their chance to put an end to the “lost years.”

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  8. Solvent S.A. (B) GE1-119-B

    This is the second part of the Solvent S.A. case. It describes what happened after Santos announced that he and his son would either sell all of their shares or buy shares until they owned 51% of the company. Shareholders were hit by another surprise when Dangond then decided that he did not want to be a minority shareholder so if Santiago were to sell, he would too.

    Since the shareholders wanted to keep the company, they secured a loan to buy the shares but then the 42 percent group decided to reject their offer and to increase the price. They continued to negotiate the share price but it ended up being too high so the 58 percent group sold its total share in Solvent. Although they received a lot of cash, they ended up losing their company and breaking up their family.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
  9. Solvent S.A. (A) GE1-119-A-I

    This case is about Solvent S.A. and disputes between its shareholders eventually leading to a shocking turn of events. The beginning of the case gives details about the cement industry as well as information on how the company was started. When the company was founded, the shareholders included family members from the Salazar and Santos family and a family friend, Edgar Dangond. It describes how the there was a lot of trust between the shareholders and there was a family feel.

    But then it goes on to describe how a series of disputes split the shareholders into two groups. The first dispute happened in November 2005, when there was a cash flow problem so the general manager, Dangond’s son, decided to delay the payment of dividends two weeks without informing shareholders. The shareholders were upset about this and included it as a point at their meeting. During this meeting, the general manager’s salary came up and things started to get ugly. While Santos and Dangond considered the salary to be acceptable, Salazar and his family considered it to be totally unrealistic. This split them into two groups.

    The situation continued to go downhill leading to the approval of a new board. After yet another disagreement where Javier Dangond and Juan Santos were accused of working together too closely, Santiago Santos Prado shocked the shareholders during a meeting where he read a letter stating that the company culture had changed and there was no longer trust so he and his son wanted to either sell their shares or to buy more shares until they reached 51% and were no longer the minority.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
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