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  1. ABB and Galindo: Winning the Peace (A) RH1-148-A-I

    The complexity of restructuring of large companies can hardly ever be ignored. ABB & Galindo brings up the dilemma of Esther, Human Resources director at the factory, when she is faced with the transition of a factory into a service center. This meant either relocating, retraining or letting go most if not all of the current workers, with the additional complication that even after the official announcement the factory still had to run for another 18 months. This case also has a part B.

    Academic Area:
    Human Resources | Negotiation
  2. J. Rutz. Developing a Strategic Continuous Improveme … DO1-156-I

    The case study describes the experience of Javier Rutz as operations director and later as general manager of NERTUS, a leading company in the sector of railway maintenance services in Spain.

    The company was founded by Spanish rail operator Renfe and Siemens, a leading train manufacturing company, to provide maintenance services for Siemens’ trains. From the beginning, NERTUS stands out for the high quality of its services and its great capacity for continuous improvement.
    Shortly after its Foundation, Javier Rutz joined the company, first as director of operations and later as general manager. During this period, the philosophy of continuous improvement reached its maximum splendor.

    After concluding a highly successful professional stage, Javier Rutz leaves the company and asks himself which is the best way to exploit his experience for his professional future: should he continue as a senior executive in another company or undertake a different challenge through his own company to provide consulting services that offer “the design and implementation of management models based on continuous improvement, with a strategic perspective?” 

    Aims to identify what are the key strategic and organizational elements that allow the successful implementation of a continuous improvement methodology. These strategic and organizational variables, such as customer orientation, company culture, leadership, transparency of information, etc., are shown throughout the case in a general way and in some examples presented by J. Rutz on NERTUS.

    Academic Area:
    Operations & Supply Chain Management
  3. Eva Brollo: The Light-and-Shadow Play CO1-268-I

    Eva Brollo, a successful young professional, gets promoted to lead a team of people for the first time. Following the recipe for success that has worked for her so far, she jumps into the role trying to achieve as much as possible herself and setting strict expectations for her team members. However, her direct style rubs off other company leaders the wrong way and the team relationships begin to suffer. Eva’s boss, Alex Korbel, tried to remedy the situation by having a series of conversations with her and doing a 360-degree feedback exercise, but the situation may already be beyond repair. She is a talent and a valuable asset to the company, so it is not an easy decision, and Alex guesses that he might have also contributed to the problem. This is a typical story of a talented but inexperienced young manager, which can be used to teach a variety of topics related to career management, transitions, onboarding, talent development, self-awareness and career derailment.

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour
  4. Jordan's Sovereign Sukuk: A dual solution to bo … DF1-221-I

    The Sukuk sector is the fastest growing sector of the Islamic Finance Industry. Indeed, it grew by 14% within just one year (between 2014 and 2015). The total outstanding Sukuk globally stood at US$ 342 billion at the end of 2015. Sukuk has been widely embraced globally as Sovereign Sukuk has been issued by various countries such as UK, Malaysia, Hong-Kong and South Africa. Supranational entities such as World Bank affiliates International Finance Facility for Immunization (IFFI), the Islamic Development Bank Group and even companies such as Dubai Islamic Bank, Goldman Sachs and Zorly Energy have all issued Sukuk.

    The Jordan Sovereign Sukuk transaction was the pioneer Sovereign Sukuk issuance by the country. Jordan, which is one of ICD’s member countries, has been very active for the past couple of years in terms of Islamic Finance regulations and framework given that it has four Islamic banks in operation in Jordan and passed the Islamic Finance Sukuk Law in 2012.

    Academic Area:
    Finance | Innovation
  5. Product strategy: portfolio management concepts, typ … MK2-106-I

    This note introduces readers to concepts about products. It explains various definitions of what a product is, emphasizing that products are not what the producer wants them to be but how the consumer perceives them. It looks at the value hierarchy for the customer and the levels of the product (core benefit, generic product, expected product, augmented product and potential product) and then goes on to explain its physical and psychological attributes. Next, it delves into the brand emphasizing that it is one of the key elements of the commercial strategy used for products and a valuable strategic asset and then takes a look at the brand identity. Using Nike as a practical example, it introduces readers to the hierarchy of benefits and how to use the brand’s attributes to identify the final identity of the brand. It describes the differences between consumer goods, industrial goods and services and also talks about how to manage a portfolio of products using Procter & Gamble and Pantene as an example. Then it describes the stages of the product market life cycle and how it is essential for any company that wishes to remain profitable over the long term to develop new products. Looking at the Ansoff Matrix, readers are introduced to four different strategies regarding products and markets. Lastly, the note explains the BCG growth/relative market share matrix to show how to determine the strategic situation of a company’s products/markets and the AC matrix to determine the attractiveness and competitiveness of a market.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing
  6. Consumers' purchasing behavior MK2-107-I

    This document summarizes the concepts and basic processes involved in consumer behavior, emphasizing how understanding consumers' needs benefits both consumers and marketers. Understanding consumer behavior can allow companies to develop a commercial strategy that is better matched to consumers, which will increase demand and optimize the means to generate that demand. Some of the main challenges are the variability of behavior, its changing nature, and the complexities of studying it. The note delves into how consumer behavior can be studied in a systematic and precise way by using a wide range of theoretical approaches and models and how it can be affected by factors such as environmental influences (economic, political, technological and cultural context) and marketing actions. The document outlines the various psychological factors involved in decision-making (personality, lifestyles, beliefs and attitudes, motivation, perception and learning) as well as the non-psychological ones (age, sex, location, etc.) which allow the marketer to better understand the consumers’ buying habits. It explains the basic decision-making model in depth and how consumers’ behaviors can play an active role in generating value for the company or the opposite thanks to undesired behaviors such as boycotts, complaints and negative word of mouth. It wraps up by describing how to move consumers from habit buying to decision making.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing
  7. Positioning: a key factor in marketing strategy MK2-105-I

    The technical note explains the importance of the positioning strategy of the brands within the general marketing strategy of a product or a company. It also describes and analyzes the positioning as a phase in the Marketing process, the advantages of a good positioning and the common mistakes marketers run into when positioning a brand. It emphasizes segmentation as a tool for the positioning strategy.

    This material is details the process of development of the positioning and its phases. It explains stages of market definition, market segmentation, reasons for segmenting or not segmenting, segmentation criteria and differentiation.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing
  8. General Hospital Coronary Unit DO1-157-I

    This case begins by telling about what happened to a woman named Carmen when she thought she may have been having a heart attack so she called 911. After answering a number of questions, the operator transferred her call to a doctor. She had to explain her situation again and answer even more questions. Then the ambulance came, where she answered the same questions again. Next, she went to the emergency room where a different doctor asked her the same questions, some tests were done and then told her she needed an X-ray. Unfortunately, after waiting two more hours, she was told that she the tests needed to be redone because the doctor hadn’t signed the authorization for the first ones. She finally got the results and although everything was normal, she still had to be admitted for further tests. Due to a shortage of beds, she had to be moved to another hospital (General Hospital). But she still did not get a bedroom and had to go through the process of answering the same questions for a doctor and nurse again…

    Lopez Vega, a cardiac surgeon at General Hospital, and his colleagues agreed that the way patients were handled needed to be changed. In order to make improvements, they did a failure mode effect analysis in order to expose recurring errors and inefficiencies. At the end of the case, readers are asked to analyze the hospital service chain problems they saw in Carmen’s story and the process flow diagrams with the associated failure models. Then they are asked how they would apply the recommendations to eliminate or reduce the root causes of process failure.

    Academic Area:
    Operations & Supply Chain Management
  9. Airbnb: Disrupting the hotel industry? DE1-217-I

    The case describes the creation and growth process of a company of the so called shared economy with a platform business model, which was potentially disruptive for the hotel industry. Using the setting of the Airbnb entry in Spain and the response of the hotel industry, the case looks in detail at the nature of the business model of a sharing economy firm and the challenges its advancement posed for the industry.

    The case provides insights into some of the different parts of Airbnb's business model: how it creates and captures value, how a company with fewer resources is able to compete and overcome its rivals and threaten a powerful industry, when the success of its business is based on the trust of its users because the company does not guarantee safety.

    This case helps us to understand the challenges that the growth of Airbnb poses for the hotel industry and reflect on the factors that made this business model so successful.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Marketing | Innovation
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