Innovation

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  1. Instituto Feira Preta-Brazil GE1-124-I

    This case is about the story of an entrepreneur and the obstacle-filled journey she had to overcome in her entrepreneurial adventure. With this case students will learn the importance of SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities y Threats) analysis, how to face problems that arise in startups and above all how to analyse a business model. For these reasons, this case is a real example of many of the variables entrepreneurs should have in mind.


    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
  2. RELIANCE : A family feud for control of India’s priv … (B) GE1-118-B-I

    This  case study  describes the conflict between the Ambari brothers after their father´s death, for taking control of Reliance Industries, one of the largest industrial conglomerates in India.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship | Innovation
  3. RELIANCE : A family feud for control of India’s priv … (A) GE1-118-A-I

    This case study describes the conflict between the Ambari brothers after their father´s death, for taking control of Reliance Industries, one of the largest industrial conglomerates in India.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship | Innovation
  4. Solvent S.A. (A) GE1-119-A-I

    This case is about Solvent S.A. and disputes between its shareholders eventually leading to a shocking turn of events. The beginning of the case gives details about the cement industry as well as information on how the company was started. When the company was founded, the shareholders included family members from the Salazar and Santos family and a family friend, Edgar Dangond. It describes how the there was a lot of trust between the shareholders and there was a family feel.

    But then it goes on to describe how a series of disputes split the shareholders into two groups. The first dispute happened in November 2005, when there was a cash flow problem so the general manager, Dangond’s son, decided to delay the payment of dividends two weeks without informing shareholders. The shareholders were upset about this and included it as a point at their meeting. During this meeting, the general manager’s salary came up and things started to get ugly. While Santos and Dangond considered the salary to be acceptable, Salazar and his family considered it to be totally unrealistic. This split them into two groups.

    The situation continued to go downhill leading to the approval of a new board. After yet another disagreement where Javier Dangond and Juan Santos were accused of working together too closely, Santiago Santos Prado shocked the shareholders during a meeting where he read a letter stating that the company culture had changed and there was no longer trust so he and his son wanted to either sell their shares or to buy more shares until they reached 51% and were no longer the minority.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
  5. Solvent S.A. (B) GE1-119-B-I

    This is the second part of the Solvent S.A. case. It describes what happened after Santos announced that he and his son would either sell all of their shares or buy shares until they owned 51% of the company. Shareholders were hit by another surprise when Dangond then decided that he did not want to be a minority shareholder so if Santiago were to sell, he would too.

    Since the shareholders wanted to keep the company, they secured a loan to buy the shares but then the 42 percent group decided to reject their offer and to increase the price. They continued to negotiate the share price but it ended up being too high so the 58 percent group sold its total share in Solvent. Although they received a lot of cash, they ended up losing their company and breaking up their family.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
  6. BBVA SI1-126-I-M

    BBVA – The Web 2.0 Innovation (Re)-Evolution provides details of the bank’s Innovation and Transformation journey that began in 2007. This case focuses specifically on the Web 2.0 applications that BBVA developed during this period and the part they played in the company's strategy.

    This case is organized through a timeline with video interviews which allow students to review the situation of the company before the Innovation and Transformation journey as well as to consider the challenges that this plan may bring in the future.

    Academic Area:
    Digital Technologies & Data Science | Innovation
  7. ANALYZING THE NONMARKET ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS:THE … DE2-114-I

    This technical note introduces a framework for analyzing the nonmarket enviornment of business, i.e. the social, political, regulatory and legal context in which the firm operates.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Marketing & Communications
  8. Terracycle Group 6: Venture Capital (B6) GE1-117-B6-I

    This case walks readers through the history of TerraCycle, an environmentally friendly company launched by two Princeton students that faced many financial hardships and setbacks over the years.

    Szaky and Beyer, founders of TerraCycle, just won one million dollars in a business plan competition organized by a venture capital firm called Carrot Capital. Their business was based on using worms to eat organic waste, creating a waste management company that earned money by collecting waste and processing it into fertilizer. Prior to the competition, the company had been struggling. It had been running off $60,000 from family and friends and from other business plan competitions with few resources, no money to hire real employees, no factory and no scale. Shortly after winning the competition, Carrot Capital’s managing partner told the founders that although he loved their business idea, they would need to tone down the product’s environmental identity and bring in real professionals. This made the founders wonder if accepting the money would mean having to change the core of their green business.

    They had tried to get funding before by sending their business plan to many venture capital firms but they only received rejection letters. In addition, they could not find anyone who would pay them to take their garbage and no one was interested in buying the worm poop. Eventually, they hired a CEO with 20 years of experience who began recruiting board members with relevant experience. But since their business was still not profitable, they ended up changing their business model and started focusing on home users. They realized that home users may not want to have direct contact with the product, and spent time turning it into a sprayable indoor plant food instead. Following their eco-friendly mission, the company decided to “upcycle” by packaging their product in used plastic bottles. Although the company had the idea, product and packaging figured out, they were still in desperate need of funding. The company had to decide if they were going to join up with Carrot Capital, search for angel investors, go back to friends and family or try to find a partnership with the competition. They had to decide how to tailor the pitch to each group and to think about whether any funding would result from all the time and effort since their time was running out.

    Seeing the market potential for Terracycle - a fertilizer product made from worm castings - this part b is a roleplay that puts students into the position of potential investors or the founding member of the company. Each player must make a pitch in the best interest of the role they have been assigned.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
  9. Terracycle Group 4: Family (B4) GE1-117-B4-I

    This case walks readers through the history of TerraCycle, an environmentally friendly company launched by two Princeton students that faced many financial hardships and setbacks over the years.

    Szaky and Beyer, founders of TerraCycle, just won one million dollars in a business plan competition organized by a venture capital firm called Carrot Capital. Their business was based on using worms to eat organic waste, creating a waste management company that earned money by collecting waste and processing it into fertilizer. Prior to the competition, the company had been struggling. It had been running off $60,000 from family and friends and from other business plan competitions with few resources, no money to hire real employees, no factory and no scale. Shortly after winning the competition, Carrot Capital’s managing partner told the founders that although he loved their business idea, they would need to tone down the product’s environmental identity and bring in real professionals. This made the founders wonder if accepting the money would mean having to change the core of their green business.

    They had tried to get funding before by sending their business plan to many venture capital firms but they only received rejection letters. In addition, they could not find anyone who would pay them to take their garbage and no one was interested in buying the worm poop. Eventually, they hired a CEO with 20 years of experience who began recruiting board members with relevant experience. But since their business was still not profitable, they ended up changing their business model and started focusing on home users. They realized that home users may not want to have direct contact with the product, and spent time turning it into a sprayable indoor plant food instead. Following their eco-friendly mission, the company decided to “upcycle” by packaging their product in used plastic bottles. Although the company had the idea, product and packaging figured out, they were still in desperate need of funding. The company had to decide if they were going to join up with Carrot Capital, search for angel investors, go back to friends and family or try to find a partnership with the competition. They had to decide how to tailor the pitch to each group and to think about whether any funding would result from all the time and effort since their time was running out.

    Seeing the market potential for Terracycle - a fertilizer product made from worm castings - this part b is a roleplay that puts students into the position of potential investors or the founding member of the company. Each player must make a pitch in the best interest of the role they have been assigned.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
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