Innovation

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  1. Vinos de Georgia MK1-169

    The case is about how to build the “Georgia Brand” and how to position Georgian wines on the international market. The oldest wine remains in the world, dating from about 6000 BC, have been found in Georgia, which would allow us to affirm that Georgia is "the cradle of wine." In addition, the country has some 500 endemic grape varieties, and grape fermentation methods that allow making very special wines. All these elements should allow Georgian wines to be positioned as niche products, and to be sold at a high price. However, due to historical and political conditions of the last 100 years, hardly anyone outside Georgia and the former USSR is aware of these facts, and Georgian wines are mostly exported to countries of the former Soviet republics.

    The case points out to several decisions that have to be made regarding Georgian wines.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Marketing & Communications
  2. MOSABI GE1-149-I

    Founded by Chris Czerwonka, John Roberts and Julie Monniot-Gaillis, Mosabi is an app-based solution addressing the lack of financial literacy education and financial inclusion for informal sector entrepreneurs in Africa. By providing an alternative to traditional credit-scoring through education, Mosabi seeks to empower its users in the long-term generating a multiplier effect on their lives.

    It is designed to be financially sustainable as it also reduces the high cost of accessing the underbanked for the financial services providers (FSPs). In order to achieve its social and financial objectives, Mosabi measures both financial and social impact and ensures the two go in lock-step.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship | Human Resources | Innovation
  3. El Confidencial: liderando la revolución digital de … DE1-227

    El Confidencial is an example of how a young company can become the leader in an industry undergoing a transformation. The case describes the changes in technology and consumer habits that occurred with the digitalization of the newspaper industry. This has resulted in financial hardship for traditional newspapers as their model based on print newspapers fades away. 

    First, the case explores the industry by describing what success traditionally looked like and how it has evolved with the digitalization of the industry.


    Second, it explores the emergence of new digital “native” competitors and how they have managed to gain a high level of readership and influence over public opinion in a short period of time. This has redesigned the map of mass media establishing new positions of leadership, such as that of El Confidencial.


    Told in chronological order, the case explains the evolution of El Confidential starting with its foundation in 2001. The reader tracks how it faced its main challenges and achieved success.

     

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship
  4. El Confidencial: leading the digital revolution of t … DE1-227-I

    El Confidencial is an example of how a young company can become the leader in an industry undergoing a transformation. The case describes the changes in technology and consumer habits that occurred with the digitalization of the newspaper industry. This has resulted in financial hardship for traditional newspapers as their model based on print newspapers fades away. 

    First, the case explores the industry by describing what success traditionally looked like and how it has evolved with the digitalization of the industry.


    Second, it explores the emergence of new digital “native” competitors and how they have managed to gain a high level of readership and influence over public opinion in a short period of time. This has redesigned the map of mass media establishing new positions of leadership, such as that of El Confidencial.


    Told in chronological order, the case explains the evolution of El Confidential starting with its foundation in 2001. The reader tracks how it faced its main challenges and achieved success.

     

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship
  5. Sofía López - Servicios Ambientales, S.L. GE1-146-I

    Sofia Lopez is a Spanish professional who founded “Servicios Ambientales” - an environmental services agency – twice. First in 2012, after her previous employer went bankrupt because of bad management and she lost her job. Sofia convinced four former colleagues to start their own company and brought a former client as a financial partner on board. Using her positive can-do attitude and convincing communication, she defended the attempt of her financial partner to fire her. Instead, she ousted him with the help of her partners. This made it necessary to start her company a second time in 2015. Sofia held on to her clear vision to deliver quality work. She addressed late payments with partial invoicing to manage cash flow. In late 2019, Sofia was still heading “Servicios Ambientales” which now had 20 employees and offered its services across Spain and other EU countries.

    What obstacles did she need to overcome and how did she do so? What skills and techniques did she develop to “bounce back” twice?

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour | Entrepreneurship | Human Resources
  6. Sushita: Making Sushi Mainstream DE1-228-I

    Eating raw fish was not very common in Madrid in 1999, other than a few Japanese restaurants that existed. These restaurants were either targeting Japanese tourists in Madrid or well-traveled, high-income individuals who had discovered sushi abroad. Sushita’s founders belonged to the second group.  Young and cosmopolitan, both Sandra Segimon and Natasha Apolinario were quickly attracted to sushi on their trips to London and New York. 

    They started their business by developing sushi trays. After years of growing a successful sushi takeaway business, one of their most important clients was lost in an expansion strategy disagreement. The client was forcing Sushita to open a large number of sushi corners at their own expense. This client represented 35% of their sales so losing them as a client could be a huge blow to their projected revenues for that year and years to come.

    Following this major setback, Sandra and Natasha decided to never again be overly dependent on a single client. So what should they do? They knew that they needed to continue growing the Sushita brand but how? They were already present in the most important supermarket chains in Spain, and they had recently started selling frozen takeaways to major Spanish national hotel chains.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Innovation
  7. PLAYGIGA: THE GROWTH PAINS OF A PIONEER IN CLOUD GAM … GE1-144-I

    In September 2016, Javier Polo, a senior executive from the Telco sector, was appointed as CEO of PlayGiga, a technology start-up. The company had spent three years successfully developing a technology to enable users to play Videogames from the cloud, without needing a gaming console (e.g. PlayStation, Xbox) or an expensive gaming PC. However, no significant sales had materialized until now. After three months in the position, the CEO needed to prove the market acceptance for the new service. Important decisions had to be taken about the value proposition, which customer segment to focus on and about the go-to-market strategy; in particular, if a direct-to-consumer commercialization would be better than selling the service through Telecom and Media companies.

    The case is intended to be taught in the initial modules of an entrepreneurship course for Undergraduates, MBA students or Executive MBAs. It can also be taught in entrepreneurship modules within specialized masters such as a Master in Technology or Digital Business.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Innovation
  8. Mejores prácticas digitales de gran consumo MK2-154

    The digital channel turns out to be successful in different consumer goods companies. An ideal tool to create a strategy based on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) from the company itself. In this sense, it seeks to face the battles with the price and physical stores, as well as challenging territories where the manufacturer and/or provider have greater prominence.

    Carrying out the best digital practices allows you to approach the client more directly, unlike how it was done before the irruption of the digital channel. Therefore, it calls us to reflect on the trends and transformations that have been carried out by different companies, adapting to their needs and creating an updated digital marketing strategy.

    Academic Area:
    Digital Technologies & Data Science | Marketing & Communications
  9. Jane joins the club: Diversity & corporate gove … CO1-280-I

    How to make an effective contribution to a closely-knit board run by a longtime and rigid chair, and how to do so as the only woman? This is the predicament this fictional case study presents Jane Pruitt, a 54-year-old CFO coming in from another company under shareholder pressure. She is striving to make a much-needed impact on a privately-held formerly family-run metalworking machinery and equipment manufacturer overseen by five male board members (and financially interconnected friends) all about 70 years of age.
    Jane begins to suspect that the intellectual, generational and gender diversity she was hired to provide was brought on board only for public show.

    The case raises important questions about the value of diversity in a team environment and will engage any student who has been an outsider on an insular, club-like team.

    This case presents several challenges that are relevant for organizations today. First, it explores a newcomer’s perspective on being an outsider in an insider-dominated setting. Second, the case presents a number of common board/team practices that undercut effectiveness. Finally, it gives students the opportunity to think and talk about board diversity, its merits and challenges, and possible paths forward to success.

    Within that setting, several instructional objectives can be met:

    • Diversity: The experience of the outsider, and the deep frustrations of not fitting in.
    • Board Process: Board effectiveness requires both the right board composition and the right board process.
    • Leadership: The next leader is often already at the table but may not match the stereotype of the old one.

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour | Human Resources | Innovation
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