Innovation

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  1. MOSABI GE1-149-I

    Founded by Chris Czerwonka, John Roberts and Julie Monniot-Gaillis, Mosabi is an app-based solution addressing the lack of financial literacy education and financial inclusion for informal sector entrepreneurs in Africa. By providing an alternative to traditional credit-scoring through education, Mosabi seeks to empower its users in the long-term generating a multiplier effect on their lives.

    It is designed to be financially sustainable as it also reduces the high cost of accessing the underbanked for the financial services providers (FSPs). In order to achieve its social and financial objectives, Mosabi measures both financial and social impact and ensures the two go in lock-step.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship | Human Resources | Innovation
  2. ROYO GROUP: RETOS DEL LEAN MANAGEMENT EN EL ENTORNO … DO1-158

    Royo Group is a company that manufactures and sells bathroom furniture. In 2010, after the generational change in the company's leadership, it was decided to implement lean management at an industrial level to improve competitiveness, both in terms of quality, and service and cost. Initially, the implementation was not too successful, because the improvements achieved were not consolidated. However, in 2012 the course was corrected, the implementation approach and the company began a stage of sustained improvement that has reached today.

    Academic Area:
    Operations & Supply Chain Management
  3. Halo Top Ice Cream & Behavioral Economics AH1-003-I

    How do you go about making difficult decisions and what are the key psychological shortcuts and biases that may impair your rationality? This case uses the real-life example of the successful launch of Halo Top’s ice cream brand in the United States as the basis to construct a psychological review of the decision-making process of the company founder, advisers and consumers, helping to identify and illustrate some of the most common principles, heuristics and biases of Behavioral Economics. To do so, the case puts students in young entrepreneur Justin Woolverton’s shoes when he has to decide whether to launch the brand or keep his job as a lawyer, and then goes beyond to review the marketing process and consumer insights that are normally present in product introductions and promotions.

    Should Justin quit his highly lucrative day job as a lawyer and pursue his ice-cream making dreams? And, if he were to decide to launch his brand, what are the psychological biases and mind-traps that he would have to avoid (when making his decisions) or factor in (when considering those of his potential consumers)?

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour | Economic Environment & Public Affairs | Others
  4. Sushita: Making Sushi Mainstream DE1-228-I

    Eating raw fish was not very common in Madrid in 1999, other than a few Japanese restaurants that existed. These restaurants were either targeting Japanese tourists in Madrid or well-traveled, high-income individuals who had discovered sushi abroad. Sushita’s founders belonged to the second group.  Young and cosmopolitan, both Sandra Segimon and Natasha Apolinario were quickly attracted to sushi on their trips to London and New York. 

    They started their business by developing sushi trays. After years of growing a successful sushi takeaway business, one of their most important clients was lost in an expansion strategy disagreement. The client was forcing Sushita to open a large number of sushi corners at their own expense. This client represented 35% of their sales so losing them as a client could be a huge blow to their projected revenues for that year and years to come.

    Following this major setback, Sandra and Natasha decided to never again be overly dependent on a single client. So what should they do? They knew that they needed to continue growing the Sushita brand but how? They were already present in the most important supermarket chains in Spain, and they had recently started selling frozen takeaways to major Spanish national hotel chains.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Innovation
  5. PLAYGIGA: THE GROWTH PAINS OF A PIONEER IN CLOUD GAM … GE1-144-I

    In September 2016, Javier Polo, a senior executive from the Telco sector, was appointed as CEO of PlayGiga, a technology start-up. The company had spent three years successfully developing a technology to enable users to play Videogames from the cloud, without needing a gaming console (e.g. PlayStation, Xbox) or an expensive gaming PC. However, no significant sales had materialized until now. After three months in the position, the CEO needed to prove the market acceptance for the new service. Important decisions had to be taken about the value proposition, which customer segment to focus on and about the go-to-market strategy; in particular, if a direct-to-consumer commercialization would be better than selling the service through Telecom and Media companies.

    The case is intended to be taught in the initial modules of an entrepreneurship course for Undergraduates, MBA students or Executive MBAs. It can also be taught in entrepreneurship modules within specialized masters such as a Master in Technology or Digital Business.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Innovation
  6. Jane joins the club: Diversity & corporate gove … CO1-280-I

    How to make an effective contribution to a closely-knit board run by a longtime and rigid chair, and how to do so as the only woman? This is the predicament this fictional case study presents Jane Pruitt, a 54-year-old CFO coming in from another company under shareholder pressure. She is striving to make a much-needed impact on a privately-held formerly family-run metalworking machinery and equipment manufacturer overseen by five male board members (and financially interconnected friends) all about 70 years of age.
    Jane begins to suspect that the intellectual, generational and gender diversity she was hired to provide was brought on board only for public show.

    The case raises important questions about the value of diversity in a team environment and will engage any student who has been an outsider on an insular, club-like team.

    This case presents several challenges that are relevant for organizations today. First, it explores a newcomer’s perspective on being an outsider in an insider-dominated setting. Second, the case presents a number of common board/team practices that undercut effectiveness. Finally, it gives students the opportunity to think and talk about board diversity, its merits and challenges, and possible paths forward to success.

    Within that setting, several instructional objectives can be met:

    • Diversity: The experience of the outsider, and the deep frustrations of not fitting in.
    • Board Process: Board effectiveness requires both the right board composition and the right board process.
    • Leadership: The next leader is often already at the table but may not match the stereotype of the old one.

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour | Human Resources | Innovation
  7. Because there is no planet B: the case of Ecoalf DE1-226-I

    The case is about ECOALF, a Spanish sustainable fashion brand that manufactures garments, sneakers and accessories from recycled materials. By providing information on ECOALF’s products and initiatives, while simultaneously illustrating the difficulty of balancing social and financial goals, this case introduces an interesting real-world setting that touches upon various issues related to social innovation, entrepreneurship, strategy, CSR and ethics. Particularly, the case offers insights on the delicate phase in the growth of a firm in which the sales are booming and the company is expanding, while the company still does not make a profit and its long-term continuity is still uncertain.

    The case confronts students with questions such as ‘What strategic decisions should be made to ensure ECOALF’s long-term profitability?’ and ‘How should social and financial objectives be balanced?’, and allows them to explore these questions using a real company and market information.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Innovation
  8. Mobike Unicorn GE1-141-I

    The case describes some strategic, marketing and organizational challenges faced by Mobike during the path of further expansion and growth. China, as an emerging and fast-expanding market, has its unique features. Mobike, as a successful Chinese startup, was able to survive a number of rounds of fundraising and stood at a crossroad, leading to different future growth paths.

    The company has its doubts about the future. The point is not how to grow fast, but how to grow and stay in the market longer. The founder Hu Weiwei and CEO Davis Wang were concerned about the strategy for the future. The question was: should Mobike enter the deeper level of second- and third-tier cities in China, or should it pursue its global market penetration? 

    The case illustrates the challenges presented by business expansion. It highlights the importance of strategic tools, namely business model canvas, scenario planning and market analysis, to reevaluate current business operations, clarify future possibilities and mitigate business risks.

    The case could be used in business schools at a variety of levels, including undergraduate, MBA and Executive. It could also be used in marketing, strategy and international cultural management courses. It is particularly useful for participants who want to explore strategy domain or build market knowledge on Chinese markets and the growth path on Chinese startups.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Marketing & Communications | Innovation
  9. Mobike Unicorn GE1-141

    The case describes some strategic, marketing and organizational challenges faced by Mobike during the path of further expansion and growth. China, as an emerging and fast-expanding market, has its unique features. Mobike, as a successful Chinese startup, was able to survive a number of rounds of fundraising and stood at a crossroad, leading to different future growth paths.

    The company has its doubts about the future. The point is not how to grow fast, but how to grow and stay in the market longer. The founder Hu Weiwei and CEO Davis Wang were concerned about the strategy for the future. The question was: should Mobike enter the deeper level of second- and third-tier cities in China, or should it pursue its global market penetration? 

    The case illustrates the challenges presented by business expansion. It highlights the importance of strategic tools, namely business model canvas, scenario planning and market analysis, to reevaluate current business operations, clarify future possibilities and mitigate business risks.

    The case could be used in business schools at a variety of levels, including undergraduate, MBA and Executive. It could also be used in marketing, strategy and international cultural management courses. It is particularly useful for participants who want to explore strategy domain or build market knowledge on Chinese markets and the growth path on Chinese startups.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Marketing & Communications | Innovation
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