Marketing & Communications

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  1. Técnicas de innovación MK2-144

    This learning material describes the method that is necessary for the process of innovation of a brand. From the attitude and inspiration to the sophistication of the message to influence the perception of who receives it. 

    Academic Area:
    Marketing & Communications | Innovation
  2. Marketing programático MK2-150

    Programmatic marketing allows the user to be impacted at an exact moment and in a specific context in such a way that this impact occurring is conditional on something happening and in milliseconds. By being marketing automation, there is technology behind it.

    The term covers a wide range of technologies that allow the purchase process, ad placement and advertising optimization to be automated.

    Because advertisers now have more information about users (pages they visit, articles they search for, what they share on their social networks, etc.), they can address them with messages more accurately than ever.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing & Communications
  3. KPI y métricas según canal y objetivo de negocio MK2-148

    It is important to distinguish concepts that are sometimes confused and are different things: data, metrics and KPIs. In this material, these three concepts and their most relevant uses are studied.

    Data are cold figures. Data collection generates information in the form of metrics. And the most relevant metrics that allow taking stock of businesses are KPIs (key performance indicators).

    Dashboards usually collect these KPIs and all the information elements needed to facilitate decision making. They are very important in management and aim to review the most relevant business information at a glance.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing & Communications
  4. Cómo detectar en qué etapa de la relación se encuent … MK2-149

    In marketing, especially now when relationships with consumers are built on the basis of the entire purchasing funnel in a coherent and linked way, it is key to detect what phase of the funnel the consumer is in with the brand.

    A brand’s ultimate goal is always for the consumer to buy. But why does the consumer not do it? Is it because he does not know me? Does he know me but not prefer me? And if he does it, does he buy again and recommend me?

    This is key because the strategy to work on awareness (TV) is different than the one to work on consideration (product test), preference (working with advocates) or purchase (promotions).

    Academic Area:
    Marketing & Communications
  5. Claves de la Customer Centricity MK2-145

    This document analyzes the conceptualization, customer centricity variables and variables that measure it in a company, it helps to evaluate if a company has customer orientation and learn what to do to reinforce it.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing & Communications
  6. Jordan's Sovereign Sukuk: A dual solution to bo … DF1-221-I

    The Sukuk sector is the fastest growing sector of the Islamic Finance Industry. Indeed, it grew by 14% within just one year (between 2014 and 2015). The total outstanding Sukuk globally stood at US$ 342 billion at the end of 2015. Sukuk has been widely embraced globally as Sovereign Sukuk has been issued by various countries such as UK, Malaysia, Hong-Kong and South Africa. Supranational entities such as World Bank affiliates International Finance Facility for Immunization (IFFI), the Islamic Development Bank Group and even companies such as Dubai Islamic Bank, Goldman Sachs and Zorly Energy have all issued Sukuk.

    The Jordan Sovereign Sukuk transaction was the pioneer Sovereign Sukuk issuance by the country. Jordan, which is one of ICD’s member countries, has been very active for the past couple of years in terms of Islamic Finance regulations and framework given that it has four Islamic banks in operation in Jordan and passed the Islamic Finance Sukuk Law in 2012.

    Academic Area:
    Finance | Innovation
  7. Professional Toxicity: A Case Study CO1-275-I

    This case study explores the personal and professional effects of working for a toxic boss and how to approach such a situation. The case is told in first-person, which helps readers fully understand the frustrations that come along with having to work under a superior whose attitude, inability to accept his failures and lack of communication and feedback not only negatively affects the work experience, but also put business negotiations in jeopardy.

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour
  8. Agustin's decisions CO1-274-I

    Finding a balance between professional and personal goals is a challenge that is more and more commonplace. This case follows the story of Agustín, a young professional whose mother is diagnosed with lung cancer amid plans for pursuing an MBA abroad, being a newlywed, helping with his family’s business. In situations such as these, the decision of whether to continue ahead with professional plans becomes quite complex.

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour
  9. Product strategy: portfolio management concepts, typ … MK2-106-I

    This note introduces readers to concepts about products. It explains various definitions of what a product is, emphasizing that products are not what the producer wants them to be but how the consumer perceives them. It looks at the value hierarchy for the customer and the levels of the product (core benefit, generic product, expected product, augmented product and potential product) and then goes on to explain its physical and psychological attributes. Next, it delves into the brand emphasizing that it is one of the key elements of the commercial strategy used for products and a valuable strategic asset and then takes a look at the brand identity. Using Nike as a practical example, it introduces readers to the hierarchy of benefits and how to use the brand’s attributes to identify the final identity of the brand. It describes the differences between consumer goods, industrial goods and services and also talks about how to manage a portfolio of products using Procter & Gamble and Pantene as an example. Then it describes the stages of the product market life cycle and how it is essential for any company that wishes to remain profitable over the long term to develop new products. Looking at the Ansoff Matrix, readers are introduced to four different strategies regarding products and markets. Lastly, the note explains the BCG growth/relative market share matrix to show how to determine the strategic situation of a company’s products/markets and the AC matrix to determine the attractiveness and competitiveness of a market.

    Academic Area:
    Marketing & Communications
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