Economic Environment & Public Affairs

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  1. African Parks: An NGO in action saving Africa´s wild … EC1-127-I

    This case focuses on one of the thorniest problems of the 21st century, which is how to save wilderness and ecosystems at a time when the countries where they are concentrated in are immersed in a rapid development process and resource hunger around the world is stronger than ever. The NGO that is analyzed in the case, a South African-based NGO called African Parks, has developed an innovative approach to preserving natural spaces and species that combines private, charitable finance and efficient private management with local government cooperation. African Parks now spans seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa and sees its task as preserving the iconic ecosystems of the continent from destruction. The case poses critical questions about: how to solve the “tragedy of the commons” while promoting local development; how private managers can address social issues, especially through the PPP (Public-Private Partnership) formula; and how the unique traits of NGOs make them ideal partners to tackle problems that the free market does not easily solve, in cooperation with governments and the private sector.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  2. Case Study: Cost Theory and Market Structures EC1-137-I

    This case presents students with exercises to put into practice economic concepts such as market structures, elasticity, supply and demand curves. Students are asked to calculate cost and revenues values, and then use these values to construct market structure models. It is a useful case to use in introductory economics courses because of its practical nature. 

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  3. Economic Superpowers EC2-110-I-M

    This interactive tutorial focuses on GDP and its importance as an indicator of economic well-being. Using the information provided, students will make GDP predictions for the world's largest economies, for the next 15 years. After justifying their reasoning the application will automatically simulate their results and create a student-specific GDP ranking for the future.

    Students also have the opportunity to rank the importance of a series of factors for deciding the growth rates of each nation. A professor's page compiles the results of the class and when displayed in class encourages a lively debate.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  4. Spain Case Study EC1-001-I-M

    This interactive case describes the main problems of the Spanish economy between 1973 and 2010 setting the context for students to analyze the solutions provided by the different governments in power. It includes significant multimedia materials (photographs audio clips of speeches and interviews newspaper headlines graphs and tables) and related texts. There are also interactive graph which can be created based on students’ choices enabling them in this way to compare key economic indexes at specific times.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  5. Pharma Supplies EC1-123

    The case talks about how a SME of the pharmaceutical industry decides to expand to international markets. It particularly decides to export a value-added product to Estonia: Semi automatic external defibrillators.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs | Strategy
  6. Fratelli Rustici International Toy Shoes EC1-124

    This is a case about an SME, in the shoe industry, that thanks to the expertise of its partners and a successful R&D investment is able to successfully operate in international markets, even during crises. The product is manufactured in China and is then imported to Italy to be commercialized in the EU, and in a latter phase in Chile.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs | Strategy
  7. Japón 2010: Los años perdidos EC1-122

    This case takes a look at the events that led up to the bursting of Japan’s stock-market bubble in 2010. It begins by describing the economic situation in Japan in the 1980s at the start of the crisis, delving into the appreciation of the yen, loss of competitiveness, low interest rates, the over-valuation of the stock market leading to inflation and the upward trend in the unemployment rate. It emphasizes that there were twenty years of poor political leadership where the political party changed frequently. The case outlines the government in Japan during the nineties and includes a detailed description of how each prime minister’s actions affected the economy. Then in 2001, seeking economic recovery, Koizumi’s government launched a comprehensive plan of reforms based on solving the problem of bad debts, establishing a stable financial system and defining seven programs of structural reform. When Koizumi left office, the economic situation was unstable and between 2006 and 2009, up to three different prime ministers occupied the post. Between 2007 and 2009, stimulus packages implemented by the government caused public debt as a percentage of Japan’s GDP to increase nearly 55 percent. This led the Bank of Japan to take emergency measures. In 2009, Hatoyama came into power, ending the Koizumi era. The government then had their chance to put an end to the “lost years.”

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  8. Japan 2010: The lost years EC1-122-I

    This case takes a look at the events that led up to the bursting of Japan’s stock-market bubble in 2010. It begins by describing the economic situation in Japan in the 1980s at the start of the crisis, delving into the appreciation of the yen, loss of competitiveness, low interest rates, the over-valuation of the stock market leading to inflation and the upward trend in the unemployment rate. It emphasizes that there were twenty years of poor political leadership where the political party changed frequently. The case outlines the government in Japan during the nineties and includes a detailed description of how each prime minister’s actions affected the economy. Then in 2001, seeking economic recovery, Koizumi’s government launched a comprehensive plan of reforms based on solving the problem of bad debts, establishing a stable financial system and defining seven programs of structural reform. When Koizumi left office, the economic situation was unstable and between 2006 and 2009, up to three different prime ministers occupied the post. Between 2007 and 2009, stimulus packages implemented by the government caused public debt as a percentage of Japan’s GDP to increase nearly 55 percent. This led the Bank of Japan to take emergency measures. In 2009, Hatoyama came into power, ending the Koizumi era. The government then had their chance to put an end to the “lost years.”

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  9. [Japanese Version] Japan 2010: The lost years EC1-122-J

    This case takes a look at the events that led up to the bursting of Japan’s stock-market bubble in 2010. It begins by describing the economic situation in Japan in the 1980s at the start of the crisis, delving into the appreciation of the yen, loss of competitiveness, low interest rates, the over-valuation of the stock market leading to inflation and the upward trend in the unemployment rate. It emphasizes that there were twenty years of poor political leadership where the political party changed frequently. The case outlines the government in Japan during the nineties and includes a detailed description of how each prime minister’s actions affected the economy. Then in 2001, seeking economic recovery, Koizumi’s government launched a comprehensive plan of reforms based on solving the problem of bad debts, establishing a stable financial system and defining seven programs of structural reform. When Koizumi left office, the economic situation was unstable and between 2006 and 2009, up to three different prime ministers occupied the post. Between 2007 and 2009, stimulus packages implemented by the government caused public debt as a percentage of Japan’s GDP to increase nearly 55 percent. This led the Bank of Japan to take emergency measures. In 2009, Hatoyama came into power, ending the Koizumi era. The government then had their chance to put an end to the “lost years.”

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
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