Economic Environment & Public Affairs

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  1. Goiko Grill GE1-148-I-M

     The multimedia case study will tell the story of Goiko Grill; a casual dining restaurant in Spain, with roots from Venezuela. It looks at its exponential rise over a five year period and how keeping strong to a core culture has proved vital in its success.

    The story is told through exclusive interviews with Andoni Goicoechea, the owner and founder, and his journey over the last five years. We also speak to his staff on their experiences during this rapid growth – some moving from waiter to senior leadership in this short period of time.

    There will be separate sections, which will progress chronologically: Starting the company; Scaling and whether to franchise; To sell or not; International/future expansion.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs | Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Innovation
  2. ROYO GROUP: RETOS DEL LEAN MANAGEMENT EN EL ENTORNO … DO1-158

    Royo Group is a company that manufactures and sells bathroom furniture. In 2010, after the generational change in the company's leadership, it was decided to implement lean management at an industrial level to improve competitiveness, both in terms of quality, and service and cost. Initially, the implementation was not too successful, because the improvements achieved were not consolidated. However, in 2012 the course was corrected, the implementation approach and the company began a stage of sustained improvement that has reached today.

    Academic Area:
    Operations & Supply Chain Management
  3. Halo Top Ice Cream & Behavioral Economics AH1-003-I

    How do you go about making difficult decisions and what are the key psychological shortcuts and biases that may impair your rationality? This case uses the real-life example of the successful launch of Halo Top’s ice cream brand in the United States as the basis to construct a psychological review of the decision-making process of the company founder, advisers and consumers, helping to identify and illustrate some of the most common principles, heuristics and biases of Behavioral Economics. To do so, the case puts students in young entrepreneur Justin Woolverton’s shoes when he has to decide whether to launch the brand or keep his job as a lawyer, and then goes beyond to review the marketing process and consumer insights that are normally present in product introductions and promotions.

    Should Justin quit his highly lucrative day job as a lawyer and pursue his ice-cream making dreams? And, if he were to decide to launch his brand, what are the psychological biases and mind-traps that he would have to avoid (when making his decisions) or factor in (when considering those of his potential consumers)?

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour | Economic Environment & Public Affairs | Others
  4. Ethiopia: Doing business at the bottom of the pyrami … EC1-139-I-M

    What is it like to live and do business at the base of the pyramid? This multimedia is the second part in a series of reports from students who have spent time living, working and volunteering in Ethiopia.

    This installment focuses on the different types of businesses that exist and operate in the East African country and begins to explore both the opportunities and challenges that business owners face. Here we display the first-hand accounts from those who have spent time in large and small companies and can relay the challenges of doing business in the bottom of the pyramid.

    The students´ experiences are brought to life through images and video interviews. The conclusion posing the ultimate question: Can money be made doing business at the bottom of the pyramid?

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  5. General Hospital Coronary Unit DO1-157-I

    This case begins by telling about what happened to a woman named Carmen when she thought she may have been having a heart attack so she called 911. After answering a number of questions, the operator transferred her call to a doctor. She had to explain her situation again and answer even more questions. Then the ambulance came, where she answered the same questions again. Next, she went to the emergency room where a different doctor asked her the same questions, some tests were done and then told her she needed an X-ray. Unfortunately, after waiting two more hours, she was told that she the tests needed to be redone because the doctor hadn’t signed the authorization for the first ones. She finally got the results and although everything was normal, she still had to be admitted for further tests. Due to a shortage of beds, she had to be moved to another hospital (General Hospital). But she still did not get a bedroom and had to go through the process of answering the same questions for a doctor and nurse again…

    Lopez Vega, a cardiac surgeon at General Hospital, and his colleagues agreed that the way patients were handled needed to be changed. In order to make improvements, they did a failure mode effect analysis in order to expose recurring errors and inefficiencies. At the end of the case, readers are asked to analyze the hospital service chain problems they saw in Carmen’s story and the process flow diagrams with the associated failure models. Then they are asked how they would apply the recommendations to eliminate or reduce the root causes of process failure.

    Academic Area:
    Operations & Supply Chain Management
  6. J. Rutz. Developing a Strategic Continuous Improveme … DO1-156-I

    The case study describes the experience of Javier Rutz as operations director and later as general manager of NERTUS, a leading company in the sector of railway maintenance services in Spain.

    The company was founded by Spanish rail operator Renfe and Siemens, a leading train manufacturing company, to provide maintenance services for Siemens’ trains. From the beginning, NERTUS stands out for the high quality of its services and its great capacity for continuous improvement.
    Shortly after its Foundation, Javier Rutz joined the company, first as director of operations and later as general manager. During this period, the philosophy of continuous improvement reached its maximum splendor.

    After concluding a highly successful professional stage, Javier Rutz leaves the company and asks himself which is the best way to exploit his experience for his professional future: should he continue as a senior executive in another company or undertake a different challenge through his own company to provide consulting services that offer “the design and implementation of management models based on continuous improvement, with a strategic perspective?” 

    Aims to identify what are the key strategic and organizational elements that allow the successful implementation of a continuous improvement methodology. These strategic and organizational variables, such as customer orientation, company culture, leadership, transparency of information, etc., are shown throughout the case in a general way and in some examples presented by J. Rutz on NERTUS.

    Academic Area:
    Operations & Supply Chain Management
  7. J. Rutz. Desarrollo de un modelo estratégico de mejo … DO1-156

    The case study describes the experience of Javier Rutz as operations director and later as general manager of NERTUS, a leading company in the sector of railway maintenance services in Spain.

    The company was founded by Spanish rail operator Renfe and Siemens, a leading train manufacturing company, to provide maintenance services for Siemens’ trains. From the beginning, NERTUS stands out for the high quality of its services and its great capacity for continuous improvement.
    Shortly after its Foundation, Javier Rutz joined the company, first as director of operations and later as general manager. During this period, the philosophy of continuous improvement reached its maximum splendor.

    After concluding a highly successful professional stage, Javier Rutz leaves the company and asks himself which is the best way to exploit his experience for his professional future: should he continue as a senior executive in another company or undertake a different challenge through his own company to provide consulting services that offer “the design and implementation of management models based on continuous improvement, with a strategic perspective?” 

    Aims to identify what are the key strategic and organizational elements that allow the successful implementation of a continuous improvement methodology. These strategic and organizational variables, such as customer orientation, company culture, leadership, transparency of information, etc., are shown throughout the case in a general way and in some examples presented by J. Rutz on NERTUS.

    Academic Area:
    Operations & Supply Chain Management
  8. QE Liquidity in search of profitability: the dilemma … EC1-135-I

    This case seeks two purposes. First, illustrating the relevance of the economic environment for determining business profitability. Second, putting in practice students acquired macroeconomic analytical skills by using them to support a real life financial investment decision. The students are asked to endorse one of two options, US or Brazil, for the launching of a new investment fund by FTInvest, a financial investment company. The recommendation is made by students acting as members of the Economic Research Department of the company. Therefore, it should be based on the country identified by them as providing the most favorable economic environment for the profitability of the investment in the medium/long run. The decision takes place in the second half of 2011, at a time when the US economy showed a hesitant recovery after the Great Global Recession of 2008 and when the Brazilian economy was booming after a very short blip. It was also at a time when, due to ultra-loose US monetary policy, interest rates and yields were at historical lows in the US while they were relatively high in Brazil.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs | Finance
  9. Iberian Lifts, S.A. DO1-155

    Iberian Lifts is a manufacturer of elevators, which is experiencing a serious financial crisis. The shareholders—the founder’s sons—are selling their shares for a nominal €1 to their main supplier Nomo Electronics. The new owner of the company, Alberto Nogales, has appointed Lucas Alemany as managing director of Iberian Lifts. Up until this time, Alemany has been director of operations at Nomo Electronics.

    The morning after signing the share purchase agreement, Nogales is visiting the plant. During his tour of the factory, an incident involving two workers occurs which leads to their dismissal without any warning. The manager of that section is also fired for not carrying out orders.

    In the afternoon, Nogales leaves the factory to return to Nomo Electronics’ offices, situated in another city. Alemany remains as the top executive and is unsure about what will happen the following day with the union representatives regarding the dismissal of three colleagues. He is not sure if Nogales’s actions will increase the social tension in the factory even more, or, on the contrary, if it will facilitate the management of the changes to be made.

    This case is very well suited as a first approach to the case method for students, especially given its short and concise format.

    Academic Area:
    Operations & Supply Chain Management
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