Economic Environment & Public Affairs

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  1. Goiko Grill GE1-148-I-M

     The multimedia case study will tell the story of Goiko Grill; a casual dining restaurant in Spain, with roots from Venezuela. It looks at its exponential rise over a five year period and how keeping strong to a core culture has proved vital in its success.

    The story is told through exclusive interviews with Andoni Goicoechea, the owner and founder, and his journey over the last five years. We also speak to his staff on their experiences during this rapid growth – some moving from waiter to senior leadership in this short period of time.

    There will be separate sections, which will progress chronologically: Starting the company; Scaling and whether to franchise; To sell or not; International/future expansion.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs | Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Innovation
  2. Halo Top Ice Cream & Behavioral Economics AH1-003-I

    How do you go about making difficult decisions and what are the key psychological shortcuts and biases that may impair your rationality? This case uses the real-life example of the successful launch of Halo Top’s ice cream brand in the United States as the basis to construct a psychological review of the decision-making process of the company founder, advisers and consumers, helping to identify and illustrate some of the most common principles, heuristics and biases of Behavioral Economics. To do so, the case puts students in young entrepreneur Justin Woolverton’s shoes when he has to decide whether to launch the brand or keep his job as a lawyer, and then goes beyond to review the marketing process and consumer insights that are normally present in product introductions and promotions.

    Should Justin quit his highly lucrative day job as a lawyer and pursue his ice-cream making dreams? And, if he were to decide to launch his brand, what are the psychological biases and mind-traps that he would have to avoid (when making his decisions) or factor in (when considering those of his potential consumers)?

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour | Economic Environment & Public Affairs | Others
  3. Ethiopia: Doing business at the bottom of the pyrami … EC1-139-I-M

    What is it like to live and do business at the base of the pyramid? This multimedia is the second part in a series of reports from students who have spent time living, working and volunteering in Ethiopia.

    This installment focuses on the different types of businesses that exist and operate in the East African country and begins to explore both the opportunities and challenges that business owners face. Here we display the first-hand accounts from those who have spent time in large and small companies and can relay the challenges of doing business in the bottom of the pyramid.

    The students´ experiences are brought to life through images and video interviews. The conclusion posing the ultimate question: Can money be made doing business at the bottom of the pyramid?

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  4. The Oil Sector: The importance of inventory ratios CF1-126-A-I

    Theresa has been hired for her first job as a junior equity research analyst in an investment bank. The first assignment that her boss gives her is to help with the coverage of the oil sector. She uses a Top-down approach in the sector analysis looking at macro, sector and then company specific issues. Theresa has to decide which will be the best company to include in the model portfolio from a selection of European and American companies. To make this decision, Theresa needs to compare the financial ratios of the different companies, paying special attention to inventory ratios, which are key to the sector. Furthermore, the oil sector recently experienced an unexpected and sharp fall in the Brent price that is impacting the financial reports of the companies and their stock prices. During a coffee break, she saw a senior analyst named Bruno. They talked about her report and he warned her to check that the ratios are comparable. The case ends with Theresa recalculating her numbers and being surprised by the results.

    This case is intended for undergraduates. The case "Valuation & Accounting: You can't have one without the other" is similar, but intended for master degrees, if that is your target.

    Academic Area:
    Financial Accounting | Cost Accounting & Management Control
  5. Valuation & Accounting: You can't have one … CF1-126-B-I

    Theresa has been hired for her first job as a junior equity research analyst in an investment bank. The first assignment that her boss gives her is to help with the coverage of the oil sector. She uses a Top-down approach in the sector analysis looking at macro, sector and then company specific issues. Theresa has to decide which will be the best company to include in the model portfolio from a selection of European and American companies. To make this decision, Theresa needs to compare the financial ratios of the different companies, paying special attention to inventory ratios, which are key to the sector. Furthermore, the oil sector recently experienced an unexpected and sharp fall in the Brent price that is impacting the financial reports of the companies and their stock prices. During a coffee break, she saw a senior analyst named Bruno. They talked about her report and he warned her to check that the ratios are comparable. The case ends with Theresa recalculating her numbers and being surprised by the results.

    This case is intended for master level degrees. The case "The Oil Sector: The importance of inventory ratios" is similar, but intended for undergraduates, if that's your target.

    Academic Area:
    Financial Accounting | Cost Accounting & Management Control
  6. The Terminus Hotel (A) CG1-130-A-I

    The “Terminus” Hotel, a 200-room facility, is located within the city walls of one of the most impressive medieval towns in Southern Europe. As consequence of poor management and old-fashioned interior design, the Hotel experienced slumping demand since 2001. In 2004, the Hotel was on the brink of bankruptcy.  In a sudden, these dark prospects turned into hopeful ones; the Hotel was located on a historic building and the regional authorities approached Mr. Leo D. Marcial, chair of the Chamber of Commerce, to mobilize local entrepreneurs in order to take over hotel ownership. 

    This case presents the opportunity to do a profitability analysis of Hotel Terminus, which after a general renovation has once again opened its doors to guests. This analysis is motivated by poor results, that even though they were planned to be in red numbers, the losses are larger than expected. The hotel offers three distinct services: accommodation, restaurant and entertainment (flamenco).

    For the writing of this case, several bits of data have been modified to protect the identity of the company.

    Academic Area:
    Cost Accounting & Management Control
  7. The Terminus Hotel (B) CG1-130-B-I

    The “Terminus” Hotel, a 200-room facility, is located within the city walls of one of the most impressive medieval towns in Southern Europe. As consequence of poor management and old-fashioned interior design, the Hotel experienced slumping demand since 2001. In 2004, the Hotel was on the brink of bankruptcy.  In a sudden, these dark prospects turned into hopeful ones; the Hotel was located on a historic building and the regional authorities approached Mr. Leo D. Marcial, chair of the Chamber of Commerce, to mobilize local entrepreneurs in order to take over hotel ownership. 

    This part B analyzes a particular situation related to a couple of tour operators that propose to the hotel a regular booking of rooms per day, however at a discounted cost. This possibility was refused because of a recommendation of the accounting department, together with a later proposal with similar terms, though with a lesser discount. This short case offers information on fixed and variable costs and more information to analyze why management took this position so that the student can analyze it to agree or disagree on it.

    Academic Area:
    Cost Accounting & Management Control
  8. QE Liquidity in search of profitability: the dilemma … EC1-135-I

    This case seeks two purposes. First, illustrating the relevance of the economic environment for determining business profitability. Second, putting in practice students acquired macroeconomic analytical skills by using them to support a real life financial investment decision. The students are asked to endorse one of two options, US or Brazil, for the launching of a new investment fund by FTInvest, a financial investment company. The recommendation is made by students acting as members of the Economic Research Department of the company. Therefore, it should be based on the country identified by them as providing the most favorable economic environment for the profitability of the investment in the medium/long run. The decision takes place in the second half of 2011, at a time when the US economy showed a hesitant recovery after the Great Global Recession of 2008 and when the Brazilian economy was booming after a very short blip. It was also at a time when, due to ultra-loose US monetary policy, interest rates and yields were at historical lows in the US while they were relatively high in Brazil.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs | Finance
  9. Japan EC1-134-I-M

    This interactive case study combines data that is publicly available in Google Data with questions for the students so they can reflect on the policies of Japan that affect their economic development.

    The idea is that students can understand the liquidity trap (how low interest rates end up making the monetary policy useless), what can be expected of growth when it is based on debt, some of the structural limits to growth (like aging population and technology) and the importance of political stability in the growth process.

    The context for the case is a meeting where the finance ministry of Japan calls on the class (who role play as consultants) to help them understand the situation. The information offered includes embedded content from google data that the students can navigate through different graphs organized to depict many of the main economic variables and relevant relations between them, and is combined with research questions to ensure active student participation. It also has a professor’s page that will include additional information on several events related to social, economic and political events that affect the aforementioned variables, as well as a place to display the student’s answers, that may be hand-picked if desired.

    An advantage of using Google Data for this case is the fact that the information is kept permanently up-to-date

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
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