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  1. Solvent S.A. (A) GE1-119-A-I

    This case is about Solvent S.A. and disputes between its shareholders eventually leading to a shocking turn of events. The beginning of the case gives details about the cement industry as well as information on how the company was started. When the company was founded, the shareholders included family members from the Salazar and Santos family and a family friend, Edgar Dangond. It describes how the there was a lot of trust between the shareholders and there was a family feel.

    But then it goes on to describe how a series of disputes split the shareholders into two groups. The first dispute happened in November 2005, when there was a cash flow problem so the general manager, Dangond’s son, decided to delay the payment of dividends two weeks without informing shareholders. The shareholders were upset about this and included it as a point at their meeting. During this meeting, the general manager’s salary came up and things started to get ugly. While Santos and Dangond considered the salary to be acceptable, Salazar and his family considered it to be totally unrealistic. This split them into two groups.

    The situation continued to go downhill leading to the approval of a new board. After yet another disagreement where Javier Dangond and Juan Santos were accused of working together too closely, Santiago Santos Prado shocked the shareholders during a meeting where he read a letter stating that the company culture had changed and there was no longer trust so he and his son wanted to either sell their shares or to buy more shares until they reached 51% and were no longer the minority.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
  2. Solvent S.A. (B) GE1-119-B-I

    This is the second part of the Solvent S.A. case. It describes what happened after Santos announced that he and his son would either sell all of their shares or buy shares until they owned 51% of the company. Shareholders were hit by another surprise when Dangond then decided that he did not want to be a minority shareholder so if Santiago were to sell, he would too.

    Since the shareholders wanted to keep the company, they secured a loan to buy the shares but then the 42 percent group decided to reject their offer and to increase the price. They continued to negotiate the share price but it ended up being too high so the 58 percent group sold its total share in Solvent. Although they received a lot of cash, they ended up losing their company and breaking up their family.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
  3. Solvent S.A. (A) GE1-119-A

    This case is about Solvent S.A. and disputes between its shareholders eventually leading to a shocking turn of events. The beginning of the case gives details about the cement industry as well as information on how the company was started. When the company was founded, the shareholders included family members from the Salazar and Santos family and a family friend, Edgar Dangond. It describes how the there was a lot of trust between the shareholders and there was a family feel.

    But then it goes on to describe how a series of disputes split the shareholders into two groups. The first dispute happened in November 2005, when there was a cash flow problem so the general manager, Dangond’s son, decided to delay the payment of dividends two weeks without informing shareholders. The shareholders were upset about this and included it as a point at their meeting. During this meeting, the general manager’s salary came up and things started to get ugly. While Santos and Dangond considered the salary to be acceptable, Salazar and his family considered it to be totally unrealistic. This split them into two groups.

    The situation continued to go downhill leading to the approval of a new board. After yet another disagreement where Javier Dangond and Juan Santos were accused of working together too closely, Santiago Santos Prado shocked the shareholders during a meeting where he read a letter stating that the company culture had changed and there was no longer trust so he and his son wanted to either sell their shares or to buy more shares until they reached 51% and were no longer the minority.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
  4. Production costs, revenues and profits in perfect co … EC1-136-I

    The objective of this short case is to familiarize students with what it is like to do business at the base of the pyramid; and to use a practical situation to review the concepts of fixed and variable costs, implicit and explicit costs, and accounting profit vs economic profit. Students are also asked to reflect on the implications of operating in a perfectly competitive market, and to offer suggestions from market structure theory for a firm like the one described here, that would enable it to break out of its inevitable zero-profit equilibrium and move toward economic profits in the long run.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  5. Un caso de Coaching: Daniela Rabadan (A) CO1-250-A

    Daniela is looking for help for the conflicts she is going through in her interactions. Given that she's afraid of self-affirmation, which she associates with a loss of affection for others, her intelligence for interpersonal relationships is weakened. She is afraid to become undervalued, and hence doesn't put herself in value, and as a consequence suffers by not being valued by others. With Daniela we can see that it is not possible to understand other's behavior without understanding the concept that others have of themselves. Self esteem is a basic need to function and improve all of our capabilities. As a result of low self esteem, we see that emotions such as anger and fear dominate the interpretation of reality that Daniela has for decision making, instead of calm, peace or joy.

    The student, after going through the case, is faced with the challenge of filling the boots of Daniela's coach, and to offer their approach to help the coachee with her process.

    Academic Area:
    Organisational Behaviour
  6. ANALYZING THE NONMARKET ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS:THE … DE2-114-I

    This technical note introduces a framework for analyzing the nonmarket enviornment of business, i.e. the social, political, regulatory and legal context in which the firm operates.

    Academic Area:
    Strategy | Entrepreneurship | Marketing & Communications
  7. Caso España EC1-001-M

    This interactive case describes the main problems of the Spanish economy between 1973 and 2010 setting the context for students to analyze the solutions provided by the different governments in power. It includes significant multimedia materials (photographs audio clips of speeches and interviews newspaper headlines graphs and tables) and related texts. There are also interactive graph which can be created based on students’ choices enabling them in this way to compare key economic indexes at specific times.

    Academic Area:
    Economic Environment & Public Affairs
  8. Entrepreneuring @ IE GE1-116-I

    This case provides details about three different projects developed by IE students through the Venture Lab. Students are asked to evaluate each project and to look at the pros and cons of each project. Each project includes a section on the idea, target market, business model, industry analysis and team. Exhibits and annexes with charts and tables are also included to provide further information.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
  9. Terracycle Grupo 4: Familia (B4) GE1-117-B4

    This case walks readers through the history of TerraCycle, an environmentally friendly company launched by two Princeton students that faced many financial hardships and setbacks over the years.

    Szaky and Beyer, founders of TerraCycle, just won one million dollars in a business plan competition organized by a venture capital firm called Carrot Capital. Their business was based on using worms to eat organic waste, creating a waste management company that earned money by collecting waste and processing it into fertilizer. Prior to the competition, the company had been struggling. It had been running off $60,000 from family and friends and from other business plan competitions with few resources, no money to hire real employees, no factory and no scale. Shortly after winning the competition, Carrot Capital’s managing partner told the founders that although he loved their business idea, they would need to tone down the product’s environmental identity and bring in real professionals. This made the founders wonder if accepting the money would mean having to change the core of their green business.

    They had tried to get funding before by sending their business plan to many venture capital firms but they only received rejection letters. In addition, they could not find anyone who would pay them to take their garbage and no one was interested in buying the worm poop. Eventually, they hired a CEO with 20 years of experience who began recruiting board members with relevant experience. But since their business was still not profitable, they ended up changing their business model and started focusing on home users. They realized that home users may not want to have direct contact with the product, and spent time turning it into a sprayable indoor plant food instead. Following their eco-friendly mission, the company decided to “upcycle” by packaging their product in used plastic bottles. Although the company had the idea, product and packaging figured out, they were still in desperate need of funding. The company had to decide if they were going to join up with Carrot Capital, search for angel investors, go back to friends and family or try to find a partnership with the competition. They had to decide how to tailor the pitch to each group and to think about whether any funding would result from all the time and effort since their time was running out.

    Seeing the market potential for Terracycle - a fertilizer product made from worm castings - this part b is a roleplay that puts students into the position of potential investors or the founding member of the company. Each player must make a pitch in the best interest of the role they have been assigned.

    Academic Area:
    Entrepreneurship
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